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Syracuse Recruit Chris McCullough dismissed by Brewster Academy

Chris McCullough shown above, is one the highest rated recruits to commit to the program since Carmelo Anthony back in 2003.
UPDATE:   

Earlier today, many media outlets including ESPN, reported that class of 2014, five-star forward Chris McCullough has been dismissed from his prep school, Brewster Academy, for a violation of school rules. There are no reports on the specifics of McCullough’s actions, but it most of been pretty serious for a player of his magnitude to be dismissed before his senior year. Because it is so late in the semester, even if McCullough is able to quickly transfer elsewhere, he most likely will wind up losing an entire semester’s worth of credits which could possibly leave him short, when the time comes for him to enroll at Syracuse next year. This comes just days before the 6’10, 220 lb. recruit was expected to sign his National Letter of Intent to play at SU. The early signing period for 2014 commits is tomorrow, November 13th. Chris is regarded as one of the top 15 players in the nation and the best prospect the Orange have landed since Carmelo Anthony. Should this become more of a hurdle for Syracuse, it could derail a recruiting class that many thought would help the Orange challenge for a national championship in the 2014-15 season. The last time they won a championship is 2003, when Carmelo Anthony lead the Orangemen. McCullough has already tweeted in response to his dismissal, stating: “As a man you have to take responsibility for your actions I am accountable for mine. Minor set back I’ll be good!” Syracuse coaches and fans are certainly hoping that in fact is the case.

 
ANALYSIS:

McCullough who is from the Bronx, New York McCullough is rated #4 at his position, #3 in his region, and #1 in the state of New York. He is ranked #16 on the ESPNU, and previously stated is a five-star prospect. McCullough is a very long and athletic forward with obvious upside. He runs the court with long fluid strides, gets off his feet quickly, and gets his head on the rim. He is equally mobile laterally and is consequently a potentially versatile defender down the road while also a dangerous weak side shot-blocker. He handles the ball well for a player his size, has good composure with it in his hands, and scores around the rim by running in transition and facing up in the half-court.

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Trevor Hass