Back

Class of 2015 Small Forward Deng Adel commits to Louisville

UPDATE:   

Deng Adel, a highly touted small forward in the class of 2015, has elected to play his college ball for the Louisville Cardinals and head coach Rick Pitino. The South Sudanese native is rated five stars by scout and four stars by Rivals, 247sports, and ESPN.com. Before choosing Louisville, Adel had outstanding offers from UConn, Florida, Georgia Tech, LSU, and SMU among others. However, with the way it appears, he never gave any school other than Louisville the time of day.

ANALYSIS:

With Deng Adel's commitment, Pitino has reeled in his first big fish for the class of 2015. Adel just arrived in America about a year ago via Australia, where he moved to from South Sudan back in 2004. Upon moving away from his home country, Adel picked up basketball somewhere along the way and was forced to grow up quickly with no family around. Given his background, one would think he might have an easier time adjusting in college than many others who have not had to endure the hardships that he has had to during his lifetime. As for on the court, Adel's game is still incredibly raw, as he is still relatively new to the game after playing soccer throughout his youth. One obvious benefit for his development has been his size. At 6'7, 185, he is a natural fit for the sport, and his uncanny athleticism has allowed him to navigate the ins and outs of the game. He is at his best when he is in the open court where he can use his athleticism and long, graceful strides to get to the rim. His jumper looks natural, and his range extends out to the three-point line already. A multi-dimensional scorer, Adel can also put the ball on the floor and will his way to the rim for easy buckets. He doesn't possess advanced handles at this stage in his development, but he already exhibits flashes of superb skill with the ball in his hands that make you believe this part of his game could develop rather quickly. Right now, he is able to beat his man with sheer size and athleticism. He will need to adapt to make an immediate impact at the college level, but given his already rapid development on the court to this point, it would be foolish to say he won't make the next leap.

Print Source:

Jody Demling